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Louis Sauzedde: Building the Most Useful Shop Tool

After building the TotalBoat Sport Dory, Lou took some time off to find a new shop and reinvigorate the Tips from a Shipwright video plan. The YouTube channel, with over 140,000 subscribers, has obviously hit home with many of you. And like you, we were excited to see that Lou is back at it making videos about how we can build boats and work in our shops a bit smarter. Tips from a Shipwright has always been a great source for handy shortcuts or tricks that make boat building or maintenance much easier. We are thrilled that Lou will be building another v-bottom boat, but as he plans that project he is making more straight-up “tips” videos like this one which shows Lou making his most handy shop tool, the beloved saw horses. Have a look!

 

17 responses to “Louis Sauzedde: Building the Most Useful Shop Tool

  1. I have so much enjoyed watching Lou’s videos. It is great to see him back in action. Keep the videos coming!

  2. I was wondering what Lou was up to as he strikes me as always thinking and doing to be a fulfilled man. Good video, nice job as always. Wish we could hang out!

  3. The plywood batten between the legs also supports the top if you set something heavy like a green hemlock beam on the horse.

  4. Any idea how much weight these would hold?

    Also, would glue have been a good addition.

    Thanks for the video and the examples of other more specific modifications.

    James Marshall

  5. Fun and informative video. Lou, your so great to listen to and I always learn something from listening to you. Thank You

  6. When my parents had a house built in 1962, the carpenters left behind two simple wooden sawhorses. They probably had the same 15 degree and 5 degree angles. Nails, not screws. Very small gussets at the apex of legs. None of the lower bracing or diagonal bracing. Definitely not as strong as Lou’s design.

    Over sixty years later we were cleaning out the house. The sawhorses were still there, splattered with decades of painting projects and just a tad rickety.

    It takes maybe a couple hours to make a good pair of sawhorses. They literally last a lifetime.

  7. I have really enjoyed all of Lou’s video’s. They have been very helpful in my restoration of our 1962 Cruisers Inc. runabout. Please keep this content coming. Your the Best Lou!!

  8. Who would have thought the lowly saw horse could be so captivating to watch…
    Thanks Lou!
    Looking forward to more projects.

  9. I hate to bring it up but Lou needs to change his chop saw technique, if nothing more than just so others don’t use a dangerous technique. When using the miter saw, if you hold the stock with your left hand on the right side of the blade, you could cut your left arm or hand if the saw climb cuts and gets you. Switch hands and get comfortable using your left to control the saw and hold stock with your right when the piece you are hand holding is on your right. Lou is a great teacher.

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