Boatbuilding with Thixo Flex

Back inside Andy Miller’s Boatworks Today boat shop in Wisconsin and the upstate NY boat shed of Scott Smith and his Sea Dreamer Project, are two men hard at work on their dreams. Both dream of warmer days and nights on their boats that will have been lovingly restored in Andy’s case, and home- built for Scott.  Both boatbuilders are singing the praises of Thixo Flex in their current projects, while being used for very different applications. That Thixo Flex is so useful in wooden boatbuilding as well as with fiberglass repair, speaks to the versatility and dependability of this handy product. 

When epoxy is mixed with a thickener it becomes a very useful way to bond and to fill and fair. Working alone, as both of these gentlemen do, makes the convenience of Thixo in its  premixed and measured dispenser a very valuable team member to have in the shop. With a flexible, high-strength bond that adheres to most surfaces, it’s an indispensable part of both boat shops.

Scott points out Thixo Flex’s handiness when bonding different substrates, and Andy demonstrates how the flexibility of this epoxy can be handy for areas that might flex or move from use or from weather-related expansion and contraction. Wooden boats, in particular, benefit greatly from this flexibility as they spend their life swelling and shrinking.

Tune into these 2 awesome projects and see how Andy has continued to repair the crazing decks on his Bertram Moppie. Then watch Scott fitting bilge stringers into his wooden trawler with an ingenious way to keep his chilly epoxy at a usable temperature. If you’re looking for tips and help with your own boat projects, these guys have you covered and we couldn’t be happier to support their amazing efforts and excellent videos. Enjoy!

 

 

4 responses to “Boatbuilding with Thixo Flex

  1. We have had great results with regular THIXO and Low Viscosity THIXO as well. Have had great success with wetting out fiberglass cloth and work surfaces with the LV THIXO, then butter up the cloth with regular THIXO and clamp the piece lightly while it dries. That also works great when we laminated a transom cap from some marine grade ply with teak. Today we are going to see if it works on porcelain to repair one of the Skipper’s coffee vintage mugs (save it to look at) 🙂

  2. That video on gelcoat repair is horrible. The issues with gelcoat cracks is structure. Not even addressed. He is giving bad advise to boat owners. I cannot imaging fairing the inside radius that he has butchered.

    1. Gel coat stress cracks frequently and most cases are related to structure; but not always. In some cases it can be related to thickness, age, and quality of application of the gel coat, too. Boats move and flex; Gel coat can be extremely brittle. Also, in the video he mentions there are other alternatives for stress crack repair that sometimes involve more structural work – it just depends on the situation. I have used the technique he shows here with the repairs lasting permanently, or at least for years to date. I’ve also had to fix stress cracks by addressing problems in the underlying glass and by strengthening the structure of the surround area as you suggest. I don’t think you can fairly make the judgement you did. Also, unless you are standing close over top of the toe rail and running your hands over the repair that he did, I think your statement that he “butchered” that job is one that can be ignored by viewers. The video and position of the camera doesn’t allow you to make that assessment. Don’t know what your credentials are but I’ve been repairing fiberglass boats for over 30 years and I’ve never found that there is only one way to make a good repair.

  3. I’ve used this product to attach 22 frames to my stringers. Boat is still under construction and may be another year before these joints see any stress. It is a 25 foot hydroplane.

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