Acorn to Arabella: Treasures from the Past

We’re back in Western Mass with Alix and Steve, the motived boatbuilding duo from Acorn to Arabella who are building their “dream boat,” an Atkins ketch, to be named, of course, Arabella. We loved their latest episodes, wherein they pick apart their newly acquired, tired old Atkins sailboat, Victoria. After carting her back to their post in Granby, they take us on a tour of the bits and pieces of bronze aboard the old beauty and explain what they’ll keep and install on their new boat when she’s done. 

Come aboard Victoria with Steve and Alix and enjoy seeing them as they imagine their new boat sporting all the treasures they’ve inherited from Victoria. Fittingly, they decide to even repurpose the name sign for Victoria, using her name for their dinghy, where they can rehang the name plaque on her transom.

We love the wide range of understanding and expertise these 2 display from felling Steve’s grandfather’s tree to be used for Arabella’s mast in the episode that follows this one, to recognizing the odd bits of bronze and their duty onboard, from swim steps to turnbuckles, binnacles, and even an old sextant!

Lou will be back next week, but we’re sure you won’t mind a trip back to see these boys and follow along in their epic boatbuilding journey as well. Enjoy!

 

 

 

9 responses to “Acorn to Arabella: Treasures from the Past

  1. Always fun to watch someone else working on their rebuild. Mines a 28’ Lancer that I took down to the bare hull so I really appreciate the huge commitment it takes to do this. Cudos to the young men doing this fine work!

  2. Loved your video!. I was given an Atkins 31ft sailboat (1960’s vintage) in Pt Townsend WA September of 2015. We stripped her of all her bronze as did you and I have buckets of bronze parts, winches, a beautiful binnacle and windless! The wood hull had been fiberglassed over and the interior was pretty much a disaster. Unfortunately we ended up scuttling the boat for pretty much the same reasons you cut up Acorn. But the bronze fixtures and a great Vetus 30 hp diesel engine with only 1400 hrs were the prize., along with 5 sets of sails! I’ll be excited to follow your progress.

  3. A TAMAYA (tom ma ya) is a top line sextant. Check ebay at the costs of the sextants. Yes get it restored ! Also, get it in a protected box to prevent any more damage or future damage after repair! Remember, it is used to make the most “critical, precise” measurements. You guys are doing an amazing task.
    The “bottle opener-cork screw” is worth the costs of the boat…LOL.

  4. Doing what you love, reusing objects from another time made with love, does not get any better than that. I look forward to these videos, thank you!

  5. The video’s are Great !! fun watching the progress, After doing some of my own small projects, one can understand that almost every step forward takes a lot of effort. Just finding the parts , lumber, etc. and going to get them, takes a lot of work. john

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